Tag Archives: sf

Our next reading is _Rainbows End_, by Vernor Vinge

Over the past week I asked people to volunteer our book club‘s next reading.  The topic: science fiction.  The list: around 33 crowdsourced and curated titles collected over the past two years. And the winner?  73 votes were cast, leading … Continue reading

Posted in readings | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Which science fiction novel should our online book club read next?

Now that we’ve finished with Tressie Cottom’s Lower Ed (here are all of my notes and your comments), we can consider our next reading.  And it’s time our book club returned to near future science fiction.  Yes, it’s time to … Continue reading

Posted in readings | Tagged | 9 Comments

Why do people still disdain science fiction and fantasy?

In 2016, why do so many people disdain the science fiction and fantasy genres*? This is a question my daughter often asks me.  She’s 21 now (a fact which feel like both science fiction and fantasy, some days) and has … Continue reading

Posted in research topics | Tagged , | 23 Comments

Which near future science fiction book should we read next? Polls are open

Onward with reading science fiction! Last month we started exploring near-future science fiction, to see what insights could be gleaned about the next decade or so, and to have fun.  I organized titles and timelines via posts here, and people … Continue reading

Posted in readings, Uncategorized | Tagged | 9 Comments

The future of technology brought to you by the letter “S”

Maybe the long boom of technological disruption will slow down, ponders sf writer Charlie Stross. We are undeniably living through the era of the Great Acceleration; but it’s probably[*] a sigmoid curve, and we may already be past the steepest … Continue reading

Posted in research topics, technology | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Reversing the future

John Crowley, brilliant writer of splendid speculative fiction, meditates on the future in the most recent Lapham’s. I’d like to draw attention to two main points, beyond the brooding lushness of Crowley’s prose. First, there’s a futuring method on display.  Even if … Continue reading

Posted in research topics, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment