Search Results for: "discount rate"

Campus discount rates keep on rising, and why that matters

Private colleges and universities now offer the highest discount rates in recorded history, according to NACUBO.  What on Earth does this mean, and why does it matter? Tuition discounting describes what students actually pay, rather than what a university’s sticker … Continue reading

Posted in research topics | Leave a comment

Starting my new book project: Peak Higher Education

Greetings from somewhere over the United States.  I’m flying from DC to LA, and will take this lofty moment to announce my next book project. I introduced the peak higher education concept way back in 2013.  It was a scenario … Continue reading

Posted in writing | 7 Comments

When will the first university or college charge $100,000 per year?

When will the first American college or university charge $100,000 or more to attend? What might that mean for higher education? I first asked this question back in 2018.  I wanted to use that psychologically important six figure price as … Continue reading

Posted in economics, future of education, higher education | Tagged | 17 Comments

Which university or college will be the first to charge $100,000 per year? Checking in on a 2018 forecast

When will the first American college or university charge $100,000 or more to attend for a year?  What might that mean for higher education? I first posed this question in 2018, during the Before Times. The gist was that a … Continue reading

Posted in economics, future of education | 8 Comments

Have master’s degrees gone too far? A critique and a discussion

Have master’s degrees become a problem? Last week New America’s education policy leader Kevin Carey gave an interview to Slate.  In it Carey and his interlocutor, Jordan Weissmann, argued that American master’s degree* programs have been corrupt and dangerous in … Continue reading

Posted in economics, enrollment, future of education, higher education | 13 Comments

American tuition discounting rose again: what that means and why it matters

Today I’m going to describe a key datapoint in higher education. To do so I need to explain a deep weirdness in how students pay for American college and university classes.  Many people have a hard time grasping this strange … Continue reading

Posted in economics, higher education, trends | 7 Comments

Imagining higher education after three COVID years

What happens if we don’t have a COVID-19 vaccine by early 2021?  Or 2022?  In other words, what might the world look like if the pandemic continues at around the present level for several years? Last week I used this … Continue reading

Posted in coronavirus, future of education, higher education, scenarios | 3 Comments

Which colleges and universities are cutting prices or offering other deals for the upcoming academic year?

How will higher education make the upcoming academic year work? One strategy is to offer new financial inducements to attract enrollment.  This is especially important for campuses concerned about losing students. Such inducements can take several forms.  One is as … Continue reading

Posted in economics, higher education | 19 Comments

COVID-19 guts the middle: Matt Reed on higher ed, the economy, and the pandemic

How will the pandemic reshape higher education? Matt “Dean Dad” Reed offers an intriguing model in a new column.  He posits that American colleges and universities are vulnerable to COVID-19 in a way that echoes the shape of the modern … Continue reading

Posted in coronavirus, discussions, economics, higher education | 23 Comments

How to shrink a university and how to talk about it: one campus begins the process

For years I’ve told people about the possibility that American higher education is overbuilt.  After more than thirty years of steady growth, around 2012 we reached peak student enrollment, and have seen that population decline every year since.  A series … Continue reading

Posted in horizon scanning | 36 Comments