Bryan’s travels for June

Continuing my new habit, I’d like to point out some places I’m traveling to in the near future.  Specifically, let’s look ahead to June.

June 7th: working with the excellent St. Michael’s College in Burlington, Vermont, to explore changing traditional-age undergraduate attitudes and experiences.

June 14-16th: I’m going to be very busy at the New Media Consortium’s summer conference in Rochester, New York.  I’m offering the closing keynote, “Surviving the Renaissance: Flourishing in an Age of Chaos and Disruption.”  This is a unique talk, to be presented for the first time, on the medium and long-term future of technology and education.

We are living through a remarkable time with revolutions ripping through traditional education. Thanks to the digital revolution, an unprecedented boom in human creativity is returning to storytelling around the world. Powerful changes in economics, demographics, and globalization, in addition to technology, are reshaping education. Schooling as we know it might not survive the decade.

That’s all in the medium term. We already know all about it.

What’s happening in the long-range horizon is truly disruptive. We’re seeing grand challenges loom like science fiction plot lines. The specter of automation threatens to radically reformat the world of work and society, changing the world our students will inhabit while supplanting teaching and learning. And that’s just for starters.

How can we anticipate and act strategically in the face of such potential transformation?

I also help open the show with a preconference workshop on the 14th, one which:

introduces the theory and practice of scenarios, creative stories about possible futures for education and technology. After an introductory presentation, participants will explore a group of pre-generated scenarios to learn how best to use them. Afterward, they will build practice scenarios, drawing on a set of major trends partially determined by the group, testing out several methods. The workshop will conclude with an exploration of how best to use scenarios to improve futures capacity and thinking at learning organizations and institutions.

In between those bookends I’m leading two sessions.  On the 15th, we look into automation and creativity, or “The Robot Storyteller: When Automation Hits Narrative Creativity and Education”.  On the 16th, more digital narrative, with “Storytelling in 2016: how the state of the art just changed, from robots to creepypasta”.

On June 28th I keynote the American Medical Informatics Association’s InSpire conference in Columbus, Ohio.

From Vermont to New York to Ohio, I’d be delighted to meet up with any of you in those respective areas.

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5 Responses to Bryan’s travels for June

  1. jmartinmckinney says:

    This is the third email I have sent and wondering what happened to the first two. I am trying to reach you as I heard your talk at the Schreiner University Trustee meeting recently. You mentioned you’ve worked for museums and I am on the board of advisors of the Kansas Univeristy Natural History Museum. It might be very valuable to have you speak to us and staff. Would you please respond when you have a moment.

    Thank you.

    Janet McKinney >

    Like

    • Belated greetings, Janet! I received your email and am fighting hard to reply to it ASAP.
      My apologies for the delay; the past week has been devoured by travel, family, and power failure.

      Like

  2. Hey Bryan: May see you there – working on it.

    Like

  3. in Rochester, that is.

    Like

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